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  • Rice is a type of grass (genus Oryza) that belongs to a family of plants that includes other cereals such as
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    Rice as a plant

  • Rice is the most important human food crop in the world, directly feeding more people than any other crop. In 2012,
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    Rice as a crop

  • Cultivating rice is the – and source of income – for millions of households around the globe. Rice is grown in more than
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    Rice as commodity

  • Rice is the most important food crop of the developing world and the staple food of more than half of the
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    Rice as food

  • Challenges

    Challenges

    For every one billion people added to the world’s population, 100 million more tons of rice need to be produced each year. But the challenges facing rice production are great. Read More
  • Culture

    Culture

    Rice is a central part of many cultures – some countries even credit rice cultivation with the development of their civilization. It is remarkable that almost every culture has its own way of harvesting, processing and eating rice and these different traditions are, in fact, part of the world's cultural heritage. Read More
  • Rice around the world

    Rice around the world

    Following are detailed descriptions of selected rice-producing countries in rice regions (Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean [LAC], Africa, North America, and Europe). Of the top 10 countries in the world during 2005-09, nine are in Asia, in order: China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, Philippines, and Japan. Completing the top 10 Asian countries is Cambodia. Read More
chad

General information

  • GNI per capita PPP$, 2011: 1,370
  • Internal renewable water resources, 2011: 15 km3/year
  • Incoming water flow, 2011: 28 km3/year
  • Main food consumed, 2009: sorghum, millet, yams, cassava, nuts, oil crops, meat, maize, wheat
  • Rice consumption, 2009: 7.1 kg milled rice per person per year

Production seasons

 

Planting

Harvesting

Main
Jun-Jul
Oct-Dec
Off
Jan-Feb
May-Jun


Write-up taken from the IRRI's Rice Almanac (2013):


The Republic of Chad is a landlocked country of 1,259,200 km2 in the Sahel region of Africa. The country is divided into three regions: desert (the Sahara) in the north, occupying 40% of the total area; plains in the central part, used mainly for grazing; and fertile lands in the south that are more tropical and on which most of the 11.5 million population lives. Agriculture is a dominant force in the economy at 51% of GDP, with 66% (in 2010) of the population engaged in agricultural activities.  Arable land, however, is only 3.4% of its land area.

Source: FAOSTAT database online and AQUASTAT database online, as of November 2012.




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cameroon

General information

  • GNI per capita PPP$, 2011: 2,360
  • Internal renewable water resources, 2011: 273 km3/year
  • Incoming water flow, 2011: 12.5 km3/year 
  • Main food consumed, 2009: cassava, plantains, maize, bananas, sorghum, vegetables, rice, pulses
  • Rice consumption, 2009: 30.3 kg milled rice per person per year

Production seasons

 

Planting

Harvesting

Main
May-Jun
Oct-Nov
Off
Jan-Feb
May-Jun


Write-up taken from the IRRI's Rice Almanac (2013):


 

Cameroon is a West African nation bordering the Atlantic Ocean, with an area of 475,440 km2. Cameroon is one of the best-endowed countries in sub-Saharan Africa in natural resources. About half of the workforce is employed in agriculture, which makes up about 20% of GDP. The country has three regions: northern plains, central grasslands, and rich farmlands in the south, where most of the 20.03 million (2011) population lives. About 12.6% of the land is arable. This area is under threat of drought and desertification.

Source: FAOSTAT database online and AQUASTAT database online, as of November 2012.




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burundi

General information

  • GNI per capita at PPP$, 2011: 610
  • Internal renewable water resources, 2011: 10.06 km3/year
  • Incoming water flow, 2011: 2.48 km3/year
  • Main food consumed, 2009: bananas, starchy roots, vegetables including oils, beans, maize, fermented beverages, fruits
  • Rice consumption, 2009: 6.4 kg milled rice per person per year

Production season

 

Planting

Harvesting

Main
Oct-Dec
May-Jun


Write-up taken from the IRRI's Rice Almanac (2013):


Burundi, at the northern end of Lake Tanganyika in Central Africa, is a landlocked country with a land area of 25,680 km2, most of which is mountainous, with some plains and with a plateau in the east. Burundi borders Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Rwanda. Although the country is near the equator, the climate is moderate because the average altitude is 1,700 m. Rainfall is characterized by alternating dry and rainy seasons. Unusually, there are two wet seasons (February-May and September-November) and two dry seasons (June-August and December-January). Arable land is 35% of land area. The great majority (89%) of the population of 8.6 million (2011) is rural, occupied in agriculture that accounts for 35% of GDP.

Source: FAOSTAT database online and AQUASTAT database online, as of November 2012.




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burkina-faso

General information

  • GNI per capita at PPP$, 2011: 1,310
  • Internal renewable water resources, 2011: 12.5 km3/year
  • Incoming water flow, 2011: 0 km3/year
  • Main food consumed, 2009: sorghum, millet, maize, rice, oil crops, groundnuts, vegetables, pulses, meat
  • Rice consumption, 2009: 25.5 kg milled rice per person per year

Production seasons

 

Planting

Harvesting

Main
May-Jun
Oct-Nov
Off
Jan-Feb
May-Jun


Write-up taken from the IRRI's Rice Almanac (2013):


Burkina Faso, previously Upper Volta, is a landlocked country bordered by Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, Niger, and Togo. Its 17 million (2011) people live in an area of 274,220 km2, making it one of the most densely populated countries in the Sahel. The land consists of rolling plains dissected by valleys formed by upper reaches of the Volta River. Agriculture occupies 92% of the working population, contributes about 33% of GDP, and provides more than 85% of export earnings (2011), although only about 21.6% of the land (2009) is arable. Further, substantial desertification has occurred as a result of previous inappropriate farming techniques used for peanuts and cotton for export. Deforestation has also been rampant, resulting in a lack of fuel wood.

Source: FAOSTAT database as of November 2012. *Irrigated rice occupied on average 23% of the rice area in 1984-2009 and provided nearly 53% of the national production of rice, according to the Direction Générale de la Promotion de l'Economie Rurale.




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If you want to learn more, please read the Rice Almanac. You can purchase it on Kindle or download for free as a PDF.

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